Rainier Arms 5.56 SWITCH Rails

Rainier Arms has yet another new product being released.  This time it is the SWITCH 5.56 Rail in both 12″ and 14″ lengths.  With an attachment method like the Fortis Manufacturing SWITCH Rail, this rail will be a cinch to install, remove, and replace with the same type of rail in either a different length or for varying mission requirements.

Switch-556-12-A

Information from Rainier Arms:

Rainier Arms SWITCH 5.56 Rail 12

This version of the quick detach rail system SWITCH is a Rainier Arms exclusive.

Switch-556-12-C

It features a brand new mechanism that allows a tool-less removal of the rail itself for easy access to the proprietary barrel nut and gas block, and what we believe is most important, is to be able to quickly change rails for a variety of mission or competition specific setups.

This 5.56 versions weighs in at a mere 8.5 oz for the 12.42″ and 9.8 oz for the 14.76″. Each model will feature Keymod Slots and QD Attachment Points at the 3, 6 and 9 O’clock position as well as a full length Picatinny Rail on top.

The SWITCH, is a revolutionary design that not only looks great and feels phenomenal in hand, but is incredibly functional and adds minimal weight to the rifle – this is truly an exciting new piece of kit.

Switch-556-12-E
12″ SWITCH Model
Switch-556-14-E
14″ SWITCH Model

 

 

Features:

  • Material: Aircraft Grade 6061-T6 Aluminum / Locking handle: 7075-T6 Aluminum
  • Length: 12.42” or 14.76″
  • Weight: 8.5 oz or 9.8 oz minus barrel nut. Barrel nut is 1.6oz.
  • Conttinuous Top Rail
  • Rotation Limited QD Sockets
  • Keymod at the 3, 6, & 9 o’clock
  • Mil. Spec. Hard-coat Anodized
  • 4140 heat treated barrel nut (1-7/16 X 16 T.P.I.)
  • Clamp torque setting 20 in lbs
  • Spanner wrench needed to torque barrel nut to spec (not included)
  • Made in the USA!

Switch-556-Barrel-Nut

Revolvr Price: $189 (12″) or $199 (14″)

MSRP: $239 (12″) or $249 (14″)

Links to Revolvr Sale:

12” – http://www.revolvr.com/rainier-arms-switch-5-56-rail-12.html

14” – http://www.revolvr.com/rainier-arms-switch-5-56-rail-14.html

ATF Reverses SIG-Brace Decision

I just received this email from the ATF regarding the SIG-Brace.   I am not going to attempt to describe or interpret the letter, though it seems pretty clear with their new stance….so please read this in full for your own protection.

Aero Precision AR Pistol with SIG Brace


 

OPEN LETTER ON THE REDESIGN OF “STABILIZING BRACES”

The Firearms and Ammunition Technology Division (FATD), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) has received inquiries from the public concerning the proper use of devices recently marketed as “stabilizing braces.” These devices are described as “a shooter’s aid that is designed to improve the single-handed shooting performance of buffer tube equipped pistols.” The device claims to enhance accuracy and reduce felt recoil when using an AR-style pistol.

These items are intended to improve accuracy by using the operator’s forearm to provide stable support for the AR-type pistol. ATF has previously determined that attaching the brace to a firearm does not alter the classification of the firearm or subject the firearm to National Firearms Act (NFA) control. However, this classification is based upon the use of the device as designed. When the device is redesigned for use as a shoulder stock on a handgun with a rifled barrel under 16 inches in length, the firearm is properly classified as a firearm under the NFA.

The NFA, 26 USCS § 5845, defines “firearm,” in relevant part, as “a shotgun having a barrel or barrels of less than 18 inches in length” and “a rifle having a barrel or barrels of less than 16 inches in length.” That section defines both “rifle” and “shotgun” as “a weapon designed or redesigned, made or remade, and intended to be fired from the shoulder….” (Emphasis added).

Pursuant to the plain language of the statute, ATF and its predecessor agency have long held that a pistol with a barrel less than 16 inches in length and an attached shoulder stock is a NFA “firearm.” For example, inRevenue Ruling 61-45, Luger and Mauser pistols “having a barrel of less than 16 inches in length with an attachable shoulder stock affixed” were each classified as a “short barrel rifle…within the purview of the National Firearms Act.”                                                                                                               

In classifying the originally submitted design, ATF considered the objective design of the item as well as the stated purpose of the item. In submitting this device for classification, the designer noted that

The intent of the buffer tube forearm brace is to facilitate one handed firing of the AR15 pistol for those with limited strength or mobility due to a handicap. It also performs the function of sufficiently padding the buffer tube in order to reduce bruising to the forearm while firing with one hand. Sliding and securing the brace onto ones forearm and latching the Velcro straps, distributes the weight of the weapon evenly and assures a snug fit. Therefore, it is no longer necessary to dangerously “muscle” this large pistol during the one handed aiming process, and recoil is dispersed significantly, resulting in more accurate shooting without compromising safety or comfort.

In the classification letter of November 26, 2012, ATF noted that a “shooter would insert his or her forearm into the device while gripping the pistol’s handgrip-then tighten the Velcro straps for additional support and retention. Thus configured, the device provides the shooter with additional support of a firearm while it is still held and operated with one hand.” When strapped to the wrist and used as designed, it is clear the device does not allow the firearm to be fired from the shoulder. Therefore, ATF concluded that, pursuant to the information provided, “the device is not designed or intended to fire a weapon from the shoulder.” In making the classification ATF determined that the objective design characteristics of the stabilizing brace supported the stated intent.

ATF hereby confirms that if used as designed—to assist shooters in stabilizing a handgun while shooting with a single hand—the device is not considered a shoulder stock and therefore may be attached to a handgun without making a NFA firearm. However, ATF has received numerous inquiries regarding alternate uses for this device, including use as a shoulder stock. Because the NFA defines both rifle and shotgun to include any “weapon designed or redesigned, made or remade, and intended to be fired from the shoulder,” any person who redesigns a stabilizing brace for use as a shoulder stock makes a NFA firearm when attached to a pistol with a rifled barrel under 16 inches in length or a handgun with a smooth bore under 18 inches in length.

The GCA does not define the term “redesign” and therefore ATF applies the common meaning. “Redesign” is defined as “to alter the appearance or function of.” See e.g. Webster’s II New College Dictionary, Third Ed. (2005). This is not a novel interpretation. For example ATF has previously advised that an individual possesses a destructive device when possessing anti-personnel ammunition with an otherwise unregulated 37/38mm flare launcher. See ATF Ruling 95-3. Further, ATF has advised that even use of an unregulated flare and flare launcher as a weapon results in the making of a NFA weapon. Similarly, ATF has advised that, although otherwise unregulated, the use of certain nail guns as weapons may result in classification as an “any other weapon.”

The pistol stabilizing brace was neither “designed” nor approved to be used as a shoulder stock, and therefore use as a shoulder stock constitutes a “redesign” of the device because a possessor has changed the very function of the item. Any individual letters stating otherwise are contrary to the plain language of the NFA, misapply Federal law, and are hereby revoked.

Any person who intends to use a handgun stabilizing brace as a shoulder stock on a pistol (having a rifled barrel under 16 inches in length or a smooth bore firearm with a barrel under 18 inches in length) must first file an ATF Form 1 and pay the applicable tax because the resulting firearm will be subject to all provisions of the NFA.

If you have any questions about the issues addressed in this letter, you may contact the Firearms and Ammunition Technology Division at fire_tech@atf.gov or by phone at (304) 616-4300.

 

Max M. Kingery

Acting Chief

Firearms Technology Criminal Branch

Firearms and Ammunition Technology Division

*This letter can also be found on http://www.atf.gov/content/Firearms/firearms-industry under the “News” tab.

Google Analytics Dashboard for WP

4.4.2

– Bug Fix: additioal check for frontend widget

4.4.1

– Bug Fix: frontend widget nonce issue while using a cache plugin, reported by [Rick](https://deconf.com/ask/author/rickbates/)
– Bug Fix: clear the buffer immediately before returning AJAX response
– Bug Fix: add fullpath while loading autoload.php

Elzetta Design explains why all Aluminum is not Equal

Elzetta_Aluminum
Dave Barnett from Elzetta Design is at it again and this time he is explaining how not all aluminum is created equal.  And if you are going to SHOT Show, stop by booth 20601 and check these lights out for yourself.

From the Elzetta Design Blog:

Aluminum is aluminum, or so many people assume. In reality, very little is made from pure elemental aluminum. Rather, when something is said to be made from “aluminum”, it is almost certainly made from an aluminum alloy. (An alloy is simply a metal that has been mixed with other elements or chemicals.) There are a great number of aluminum alloys available and the properties of these alloys are critical in choosing the best alloy for a particular application.
In the manufacture of tactical flashlights, the most important material properties to consider are heat conductivity, heat capacity, electrical conductivity, corrosion resistance, and strength. The values of these properties vary significantly between different alloys (specifications may be found in various materials handbooks and online). High heat conductivity ensures that heat generated by LED chips and circuit boards is rapidly moved away from critical components while high heat capacity allows the material to absorb heat with minimal temperature increase. High electrical conductivity provides efficient electrical current flow with minimal losses. High corrosion resistance keeps components from degrading over time, especially when used in harsh environments. High strength, of course, makes components survive heavy loads and abuse. A well-engineered product will be constructed from an alloy that best optimizes these properties.
With these factors in view, Elzetta manufactures flashlight components from 6061-T6 aluminum. The differences in material properties of this alloy compared to other aluminum variants are substantial. For example, 6061-T6 boasts 28% greater heat and electrical conductivity and 20% greater heat capacity than 7075-T6 aluminum with a tensile strength 28% greater than alloy 6063-T6. The “T6” portion of the material grade refers to the heat treatment and is a critical specification. Simply specifying “6061” is woefully inadequate as 6061-T6 has a yield strength four times greater than 6061-T0. However, a heat treatment identifier without an alloy grade is meaningless (“T6 aluminum” is not a valid specification).
Despite the importance of the specific alloy used in construction, most flashlight manufacturers do not publish the actual aluminum grade used in their products. Marketing terms such as “aerospace aluminum” or “aircraft grade” are meaningless jargon with no solid definitions and such descriptors should raise suspicions. Of course, if a company does specify a specific alloy grade, the legitimacy of the claim is only as good as the integrity of the manufacturer making the claim. It is nearly impossible to identify an alloy grade by visually examining a finished product. Therefore, it is important that a flashlight manufacturer not only state the particular alloy material but also have the established credibility to be trusted in their statement (overseas manufacturers are notorious for substituting inferior materials, especially when the substitution cannot be readily identified by consumers). A well-designed flashlight is distinguished from a mediocre one by small details and often-overlooked specifications. Spurious claims of “aerospace” aluminum may indicate that a product is not made of The Right Stuff.

WP-SpamShield

1.6.6

*released 01/09/15*

* Updated the spam filters.

1.6.5

*released 01/04/15*

* Upgraded the code for the spam counter widget. The previous widget code was written prior to WordPress 2.8 and needed to be upgraded. (In WordPress 2.8 a better, more efficient widget API was added. After that, the old code still worked with minor modifications.) In WordPress version 4.1 a couple issues started appearing. (At least that’s when they were first reported.) When using the Customizer feature in the Dashboard, PHP errors related to undefined indexes would appear in logs. After upgrading to this version, any previously placed WP-SpamShield widgets will disappear from your site and will need to be re-inserted. One benefit of the upgraded code is that now multiple instances of the widget can be inserted.
* Made various minor code improvements.
* Increased minimum required WordPress version to 3.7. It’s extremely important that users stay up to date with the most recent version of WordPress (currently 4.1) for security and functionality.
* Minor update to the translation files.
* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.
* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.6.4

*released 12/30/14*

* Updated the spam filters.

1.6.3

*released 12/21/14*

* Updated the spam filters.

1.6.2

*released 12/18/14*

* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Increased minimum required WordPress version to 3.6. It’s extremely important that users stay up to date with the most recent version of WordPress (currently 4.1) for security and functionality.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.6.1

*released 12/15/14*

* Updated the spam filters.

1.6

*released 12/11/14*

* Added a compatibility fix to prevent certain conflicting plugins from triggering duplicate emails to be sent by the contact form.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.5.9

*released 11/23/14*

* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.5.8

*released 11/13/14*

* Updated the spam filters.

1.5.7

*released 11/05/14*

* Updated the spam filters.

1.5.6

*released 10/23/14*

* Fixed a bug that caused some legitimate comments to be rejected on comment sub-pages if the site was using the option to break comments into pages but not using permalinks.
* Minor update to the Dutch Translation (nl_NL).
* Updated the spam filters.

1.5.5

*released 09/24/14*

* Made various minor code improvements.
* Made some minor tweaks to the translation files and corresponding code.
* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.5.4

*released 09/15/14*

* Added a new improved blacklist function for the Enhanced Comment Blacklist feature, so it no longer uses the built-in WordPress blacklist function – wp_blacklist_check() (which is very old and has some flaws). Enhanced Comment Blacklist feature now works on WP-SpamShield contact forms as well. Please see [documentation](http://www.redsandmarketing.com/plugins/wp-spamshield/#wpss_configuration_enhanced_comment_blacklist) for more information.
* Added “Blacklist the IP Address” link to contact form emails.
* Added a fix to prevent network activation when used in multisite, and added network admin notice to explain. The plugin can be used in multisite just fine, but will need to be activated individually per site for now. Once we can get time to adapt the plugin to multisite more specifically, we can remove this restriction.
* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.5.3

*released 09/09/14*

* Added Dutch Translation (nl_NL). Thank you to Martin Teley for doing the Dutch translation.
* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.5.2

*released 09/05/14*

* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Increased minimum required WordPress version to 3.5 (which is already almost 2 years old). It’s extremely important that users stay up to date with the most recent version of WordPress (currently 4.0) for security and functionality.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.5.1

*released 09/01/14*

* Fixed a bug that caused some legitimate comments to be rejected on comment sub-pages if the site was using both the option to use permalinks and the option to break comments into pages.

1.5

*released 08/31/14*

* Added several efficient new trackback spam filters to further improve speed in processing trackbacks and blocking spam, which means even lower server load and improved overall scalability.
* Updated the text on the spam counter in the dashboard and settings page. Previously it said “spam comments”, and now it just says “spam”, since the plugin has evolved over time to block multiple types of spam. The counter includes all blocked spam types, not just comments: comment spam, trackback/pingback spam, contact form spam, and user registration spam.
* Improved human spam protection.
* Removed the M2 feature as it’s an old feature that has been deprecated and is no longer needed.
* Made several improvements to the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.4.9

*released 08/24/14*

* Modified the blocked spam error message for certain human spam comment submissions.
* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.4.8

*released 08/18/14*

* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Improved/optimized some code.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.4.7

*released 08/12/14*

* Added additional security checks.
* Improved some of the user registration and comment spam filters.
* Fixed a few minor bugs.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.4.6

*released 08/05/14*

* Added a compatibility fix for certain server configurations where some necessary PHP functions are not enabled.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.4.5

*released 08/04/14*

* Made further improvements to speed in processing comments and blocking spam. (Users likely won’t see a noticeable difference for a single comment being processed…after all, we’re dealing in milliseconds here, but these speed improvements in v1.4.4 and v1.4.5 will improve overall scalability.)
* Added French Translation (fr_FR). Thank you to Clément for doing the French translation.
* Updated the Serbian Translation (sr_RS).
* Fixed a bug in the proxy detection.
* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.4.4

*released 07/30/14*

* Improved speed in processing comments and blocking spam. Optimized the order of the filters so the fastest ones fire first, leading to even better speed and lower server load, which in turn improves scalability.
* Added Serbian Translation (sr_RS). Thank you to Borisa Djuraskovic of Web Hosting Hub for doing the Serbian translation.
* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.4.3

*released 07/25/14*

* Added a fix for emails sent though contact forms from `@yahoo.com` email addresses. Recently I noticed that contact form submissions from yahoo.com email addresses were not getting sent. After tracking this and doing a bit of testing, I was able to narrow it down to this: emails getting sent through the PHP `mail()` function from users `@yahoo.com` were not making it through. This wasn’t limited to one plugin or script, it was universal (at least in my tests). So I consulted some experts in this area, and was able to find out what’s going on. It’s related to [Yahoo’s new DMARC policy](https://help.yahoo.com/kb/postmaster/yahoo-dmarc-policy-sln24050.html). This policy effectively restricts all Yahoo users from using most website contact forms. In this version, I modified how the plugin handles the email address of the contact form submitter. The contact form emails will now come from an email address that looks like `wpspamshield [dot] noreply [at] yourdomain [dot] com`, similar to how WordPress sends out emails to admins. This should also avoid any spam problems with properly configured SPF records on your domain. (Properly set up SPF records should allow the IP Address of your website as an valid sender.) The email address of the person submitting the contact form will now only be included in the body of the contact form email (which it always was) instead of being in the “From” field too.
* Added a fix to the Settings page for when users activate/deactivate Blocked Comment Logging Mode and the “Log All Comments” feature. To use the “Log All Comments” feature requires Blocked Comment Logging Mode to be active or it doesn’t do anything. This new fix just syncs up the settings to eliminate confusion, and so users don’t have to worry if they checked both boxes or not when they update their settings. If a user checks “Log All Comments” and saves their settings, it will activate Blocked Comment Logging Mode as well. And vice versa…if a user deactivates Blocked Comment Logging Mode, when they save the settings it will clear the check box for “Log All Comments” as well.
* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.4.2

*released 07/22/14*

* There is a relatively new trend where hackers and link-spammers use search engine bots to do their SQL injections and exploits for them (to avoid leaving a trail back to them). Yes, Googlebot is being used for SQL injection exploits. Hackers use software to post a spam comment to a blog that contains a link to a specially crafted exploit URL. If the spam comment gets accepted, when search engine spiders crawl the page, and go to the specially crafted exploit URL, the SQL injection happens. The SQL injection inserts either a link or bad code to the victim site. Now **ALL** links in comment and contact form submissions will now be checked for these kinds of exploit URLs, so that these attacks will not originate from your site. (This includes the comment author website, the contact form sender’s website, and the content of both contact forms and comments will be parsed for links…all included links will be checked.) This will also potentially help avoid having Google penalizing your site for linking to bad neighborhoods. (*Automated* spam attempts of this kind were always blocked, but now that we have more intel, the manual human spam attempts of this type will be blocked 100% as well.)
* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.
* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.3.8

*released 07/18/14*

* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.
* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.3.7

*released 07/15/14*

* Fixed a compatibility issue with the JetPack plugin.
* Minor update to the German Translation (de_DE).
* Updated the spam filters.

1.3.6

*released 07/12/14*

* Added additional security checks.
* Improved the process of [upgrading from WP-SpamFree to WP-SpamShield](http://www.redsandmarketing.com/plugins/wp-spamshield/#wpss_faqs_10). (WP-SpamFree is the old version of this plugin, which I wrote in 2007, and passed on to other developers in 2010. It is no longer supported, but this plugin will gracefully upgrade from it, and import all your old settings, automatically. All contact forms will continue to work without any modifications.)
* Fixed a couple minor bugs.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.3.5

*released 07/09/14*

* Fixed a compatibility issue with the JetPack plugin.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.3.4

*released 07/07/14*

* Updated the spam filters.

1.3.3

*released 07/03/14*

* Updated the German Translation (de_DE).
* Updated the spam filters.

1.3.2

*released 06/30/14*

* Added German Translation (de_DE). Thank you to Chris Krzikalla for doing the German translation.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.3.1

*released 06/28/14*

* Removed the three initial machine translations based on feedback. If anyone would like to donate their talent and a small amount of time to translating, it would be much appreciated. It’s not hard – just [contact me](http://www.redsandmarketing.com/plugins/wp-spamshield/support/) and I’ll get you set up. I’m happy to give credit and a website link to anyone who’s willing to help out.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.3

*released 06/27/14*

* Prepared the plugin for internationalization and localization, and created .pot file for translation.
* Created three initial translations with Google Translate and some other resources: French (fr_FR), Spanish (es_ES), and German (de_DE). I realize machine translations may not be the best, but I figured I’d at least get the ball rolling.
* Removed documentation from settings page, since the same info is provided on the plugin homepage (in greater detail). The “Quick Navigation – Contents” is still there, it just points to the plugin homepage now. All the info is still available, it just makes it a bit more efficient if I only have to update documentation in one place. Side benefit is that it slims down the plugin file size a little bit.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.2.4

*released 06/23/14*

* Fixed a compatibility issue with Internet Explorer 9.

1.2.3

*released 06/22/14*

* Fixed a compatibility issue with the CommentLuv plugin. As of this version, the two plugins are 100% compatible with each other.
* Updated the spam filters.

1.2.2

*released 06/20/14*

* Updated the spam filters.
* Made an improvement to the implementation of the new semantic filter.

1.2.1

*released 06/18/14*

* Updated the spam filters.
* Fixed a minor bug in one of the filters.

1.2

*released 06/18/14*

* Added a powerful new feature to stop user registration spam. No more automated bot signups through the login page on your site..
* Added a new semantic filter to the algorithmic protection layer, for improved protection against human spam.
* Overhauled and improved many of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.

1.1.7.3

*released 06/09/14*

* Improved some of the filters in the spam blocking algorithm.

1.1.7.2

*released 06/06/14*

* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.
* Removed some deprecated filters (which have already been replaced with newer more efficient ones) and reduced main plugin file size significantly.
* Added a feature to clean up the WordPress blacklist. Now if you view the blacklist through the WP-SpamShield Settings page, it will be sorted in order and have duplicate items removed. When you save WP-SpamShield General Options (not Contact Form Options), it will store this cleaned up version in the database so that whenever you view it again, whether there or on the Discussion settings page, you’ll see the cleaned up version.
* Fixed a minor bug.

1.1.7.1

*released 06/04/14*

* Added new filters and improved existing filters in the algorithmic spam protection layer.
* Fixed several minor bugs.
* Made various code improvements.

1.1.7

*released 05/28/14*

* Reorganized and rewrote some of the code to make it more efficient and improve overall performance of the plugin. This is the fastest version of the plugin to date.
* Added new filters and improved existing filters in the algorithmic spam protection layer.
* Made improvements to the blocked comment logging data.
* Fixed a bug that caused some legitimate comments to be rejected if the page the user commented on contained added arguments (tracking variables, etc.) in the URL query string (ie. “something=value” – for tracking marketing campaigns, etc).
* Fixed several minor bugs that would show notices in the “debug.log” file if WordPress debugging is turned on.

1.1.6.3

*released 05/20/14*

* Fixed a bug (introduced in 1.1.6) that prevented users from commenting if caching is not active. One area of the plugin had not been updated to the new key generation system, causing the error, but this is now fixed. Everything works fine now, and the upgrades introduced in 1.1.6 will provide improved performance.

1.1.6.2

*released 05/16/14*

* Changed the implementation of the random key generation and testing, resulting in greater speed and efficiency.
* Fixed a bug that kept the plugin from updating its version number in the database in certain situations when upgrading to a new version of the plugin.

1.1.5

*released 05/16/14*

* Made a number of code improvements to improve overall performance, efficiency, and speed of the plugin.
* Completely reformatted the blocked comment logging data. Added some relevant technical data that can aid in tech support.
* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.

1.1.4.4

*released 05/11/14*

* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.
* Fixed several minor bugs.
* Made improvements to the blocked comment logging data. Changed the date displayed from UTC to the local time of the admin, according to WordPress settings.
* Reformatted the log data to make it easier to read, both for users, and for support requests.
* Added total script execution time to the log data so you can see exactly how long it took to run the filters and block a particular comment. Also helps with debugging and support.
* Made improvements to the readability of the contact form emails.

1.1.4.3

*released 05/08/14*

* Fixed several minor bugs (mostly PHP Notices, not Warnings or Errors) specific to changes made in PHP 5.4 and 5.5.
* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.
* For the last few weeks I’ve been making it a high priority to increase the strictness of the code because more recent versions of PHP use stricter code, have introduced new errors (including PHP Notices and Warnings) and have deprecated some older functions and functionality. That’s why the new bugs have been popping up. I’m fixing them as quickly as possible. 🙂

1.1.4.2

*released 05/08/14*

* Fixed a couple minor bugs.
* Replaced all instances of split() function, which is deprecated in PHP 5.3. (Meaning it still works, but is being phased out and will be eliminated in a future version.) The plugin was already fully compatible with PHP 5.2 and below, and this update ensures full compatibility with PHP 5.3+.
* Made some improvements to the validation of user input on the WP-SpamShield options page in the WP admin to keep the database neat and tidy.

1.1.4.1

*released 05/07/14*

* Fixed a bug that caused a “Division by zero” error in the admin spam stats (if a new install) on some systems.
* Improved some of the existing filters in the algorithmic spam protection layer.

1.1.4

*released 05/06/14*

* Fixed a couple of minor bugs.
* Made various code improvements, including code efficiency and increased code strictness.
* Added new filters and improved existing filters in the algorithmic spam protection layer.

1.1.3.3

*released 05/02/14*

* Fixed an issue occurring on some WordPress installations hosted on Microsoft IIS servers that have certain PHP functions disabled.
* Removed WP-SpamShield Options page link from the “Plugins” menu in the WP Admin. Plugin options can still be accessed from the “Settings” menu.
* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.

1.1.3.2

*released 05/01/14*

* Added new filters and improved existing filters in the algorithmic spam protection layer.
* Made a few improvements to the blocked comment logging.

1.1.3.1

*released 04/28/14*

* Fixed a bug in one of the spam filters.
* Fixed 2 bugs that caused error messages on certain server configurations.

1.1.3

*released 04/25/14*

* Added new filters and improved existing filters in the algorithmic spam protection layer.
* Improved the efficiency of the code, and reduced main plugin file size significantly.
* Fixed a couple of bugs.

1.1.2.2

*released 04/16/14*

* Fixed a minor bug in the blocked comment logging.

1.1.2.1

*released 04/15/14*

* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.
* Added additional security checks.
* Made a few improvements to the blocked comment logging data.
* Minor bug fix.

1.1.1

*released 04/11/14*

* Added better trackback spam protection. This version adds a filter that compares the client IP address of the incoming trackback against the IP address of the server where the link is supposedly coming from. If they don’t match, then it is spam, *without fail*. This will eliminate more than 99.99% of trackback spam. Trackback spammers don’t send spam out from the same server where their clients’ websites reside.
* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.
* Made improvements to the overall compatibility with caching plugins.
* Fixed a bug where the plugin was incorrectly detecting proxies.

1.1

*released 04/07/14*

* Replaced all instances of eregi() function, which is deprecated in PHP 5.3. (Meaning it still works, but is being phased out and will be eliminated in a future version.) The plugin was already fully compatible with PHP 5.2 and below, and this update ensures compatibility with PHP 5.3+.
* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.

1.0.1.1

*released 04/03/14*

* Added new filters to the spam blocking algorithm.
* Added additional security checks.
* Code improvements and minor bug fixes.

1.0.1

*released 03/26/14*

* Improved compatibility with popular caching plugins. This version adds detection to see if caching is active or not, and if specific cache plugins are active, and makes adjustments accordingly.

1.0

*released 03/10/14* – Over 20 improvements from its predecessor WP-SpamFree…including:

* Over 10x faster! Tested and verified with benchmarking software.
* Reduced the number of database queries.
* Rewrote much of the code for improved performance.
* Improved security.
* Added a number of new spam protection features.
* Added additional info to spam logging for improved diagnostics.
* Added shortcodes for implementing contact form.
* Added shortcodes for displaying spam stats.
* Added display of the average number of spam comments blocked per day to the admin dashboard.

Forked from WP-SpamFree Version 2.1.1.0, 10/10/13

For a complete list of changes to the plugin, view the [Version History](http://www.redsandmarketing.com/plugins/wp-spamshield/version-history/).

SHOT Show Survival Guide

SHOTshow

With the 2015 SHOT Show just around the corner, there are many people attending for the first time asking what to expect.  Though I am by no means an expert in SHOT culture, this will be my 5th year….so I have learned a thing or two.

SHOT_Show_001

Here are a few tips to hopefully get you through and to maintain your sanity and have some fun along the way:

  1. Wear Comfortable Shoes.  You will hear this over and over again from SHOT veterans, and for good reason.  With miles and miles of aisles and not so comfortable concrete laden floors only covered by extremely thin outdoor carpeting, your shoes will save or ruin you feet and legs after hours of being on them.  You will have to decide between comfort or fashion.

  2. NO_CARTLeave the Rolling Milk Crate Carts at Home.  With over 60,000 attendees in the past few shows, the show floor gets a little crowded.  Add in everyone toting around those ridiculous milk crates with wheels and it becomes hazardous.  Trust me, you will trip over no less than a dozen of these obnoxious things as you either get cut off or when someone leaves it directly behind you when you are at a booth.  If you want to haul around brochures, bring along a backpack or something that is off the ground.

  3. Hydrate or DIE.  You are walking a lot at SHOT, plus all of that alcohol you had last night will suck the water right out of you.  If you can, stop by a Walgreen’s or somewhere and pick up a 12 pack of water.  There is a Walgreen’s on the strip, directly between the Venetian and the Palazzo.  The cost of a 12 pack of water will be probably the same as two waters on the SHOT floor.  Throw one or two bottles in your backpack, not your rolling milk crate cart, and you’ll be glad you did.


  4. Move with a Purpose.   We all know what sheep are.  Do not be one that meanders aimlessly through the aisles or stop dead in your tracks while others are trying to move with the flow.  Have some knowledge of your surroundings and act accordingly.  If you have to stop to figure out where the nearest pit stop is, step to the side and look at your map.

  5. SHOT_Show_MapHave a Map.  You can find maps just about anywhere.  They are on the SHOT Show webpage, on the App, and in the publications you can find everywhere.  Know where the booths are or figure it out for yourself.  There are over 1600 booths at the show.  Chances are if you ask any random person where a booth other than the big name companies, they will not know where it is or have the time to give you directions through the maze of aisles to figure it out.  Need a map?  Click this link to download a .pdf version of the show floor….. SHOT_Map

  6. Have a Plan!  Have a plan, but realize that it will not work out 100% unless your only plan is to meander.  I typically make a list of all of the booths that I may have a slight possibility of wanting to stop at.  Then I take this list and break it down into priorities (Must Stop, Should Stop, Kinda Want To Stop).  The first day I will bounce between all of the rooms and floors and stop by my “Must Stop” booths.  Day’s 2 and 3 consist of hitting the “Should Stop” and “Kinda Want To Stop) booths.  Day 4 is typically reserved for making one last round and tying up loose ends.

  7. DAY 4.  Do not try to make Day 4 the day you make all of the stops you need to make and try to do business.  The exhibitors are tired and/or hung over (hey, it’s Vegas) from almost a weeks work with little sleep and just want to tear down the booth and go home.  You can see it in their faces.  They have given the same speech over and over again about their products.  This is a good time to make small, short, casual conversations with the exhibitors.  Don’t be overly demanding on Day 4.

  8. You will have Competition!  With over 60,000 attendees, you may not be as important to the booth exhibitor as you think you are.  Do not expect to gather their undivided attention for hours on end while telling them about this one time that you did something cool.  Once again, if you have a purpose, get to it and move on.

  9. SWAG.  No, not Swag as the annoying term used by today’s youth, but the acronym, “Stuff We All Get”….SWAG.  Yes, there is some free promotional items that companies hand out.  Some of it is actually pretty cool and some of it is junk.  Do not expect to go to SHOT Show and walk away with a whole arsenal of weapons and enough kit to make yourself a full time high-speed low-drag operator.  It’s not going to happen.  You might get some cool patches and some thumb drives with catalogs on it, but do not come to SHOT for that purpose alone…..and yes, I know of people who do that.

  10. Lighting SUCKS!     For the pre-approved photographers/ videographers and media that are attending that are allowed to photograph booths and the products, sorry Chinese knockoff companies…not you, the lighting sucks.  There is a complete mixture of lighting temperatures from tungsten to LED to whatever the flavor of the day was when the company was building the booths.  Set your camera to AWB and hope you have a high ISO capability.  ISO 1600 is about the minimum you can get away with.  You can use a flash if you want, but I just don’t care to get the harsh shadows that it creates.

  11. Lights! Camera! Get out of the way!  While on the subject of media, if you see a photographer or videographer shooting an image or video footage, don’t get between them and the subject or person being interviewed.  When the video has to be retaken, you are wasting the time of the booth staff, which could be time spent talking to you.  Just have common courtesy.

  12. Celebrities.  Yes, there will be celebrities in attendance.  Some appreciate the recognition and will give you the time of day.  Some are just plain d-bags.  I won’t mention names, but most know who they are.  The true celebrities at SHOT are the Military Heroes that are in attendance or guest-starring in a booth.  Take a few minutes out of your day and talk to them.  They are National Treasures and when they are gone, they are gone.  Just don’t be “that guy” that walks up to a Medal of Honor Recipient and ask them how they “won” their medal.
    Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient Sergeant Major Jon Caviani. Sadly, SGM Caviani passed away on July 29, 2014. It was an honor to meet this man, even if for only a few minutes.
    Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient Sergeant Major Jon Caviani. Sadly, SGM Caviani passed away on July 29, 2014. It was an honor to meet this man, even if for only a few minutes.

    SHOT_Show_003

  13.  Booth Babes.  Again, yes, there are some very attractive women who attend SHOT and some who dress in skimpy clothes straight off the strip to help promote a product.  Though they probably have some thick skin after doing what they do, treat them with respect.  Don’t be the douche canoe who makes himself appear like some serial rapist that should be on a sex offender registry.SHOT_Show_009

     

  14. Networking.  SHOT is a great place to network with others.  The after parties are an even better place to network.  After a few drinks, you get to really know who someone is and if you would want to work with them in the future.  Try to get into one or more of these events if you can.

    SHOT_Show_006

  15. Magpul’s Vehicles.  Magpul does a great job every year in showing off one of their masterful automotive creations.  It should be on your SHOT bucket list of things to see.SHOT_Show_005

For more information on SHOT Show, visit http://shotshow.org/

If you have specific questions, post them in the comments below and I will answer them as I have time between now and the start of the show.

Shot-Show

SHOT Show 2015 Predictions?

Glock_43

 

The 2015 SHOT Show is just a few weeks around the corner.  Do you have any predictions on what will be coming out?  Do you have any hopes and wishes of what may be coming out?  Will the elusive and unicornesque Glock 43 in single stack 9mm come out or is the Glock 42 doing good enough in the market that the 43 will be on hold for awhile?

….and yes, that G43 is photoshopped, so don’t get your hopes up too much.