Tag Archives: Handgun

First “3-Gun-Type” Shooting Competition – A Review

I shot my first 3-Gun-Type Shooting Competition today.  I say “Type” since it was more or less a fun shoot at a local-ish range (2 hours away) that was not an official 3 Gun Nation match for score, though this range is a 3GN registered club.

I was looking for a low-key, no stress event to get my feet wet, have some fun and soak in as much information as I could.  Unfortunately this range would not allow photography or videography, so there will not be any accompanying range images with this article.

3-GUN
Glock 17 Pictured, not Used G19

For firearms I shot my slightly modified (stippled, with 10-8 Performance Sights and a Glock Triggers “The Guardian Duty-Carry” Trigger System) Glock 19, a “Frankengun” AR-15 built around a Rainier Arms Billet Ambidextrous Receiver Set and a stock Mossberg 930 JM Pro shotty.  I had the AR’s scope, a Vortex Viper PST 1-4x dialed in tight before hand, but had not had a chance to shoot the JM Pro before the match…so it was basically new in box with a fresh coat of oil.  (Not something that I recommend you do.)

For my equipment belt I had borrowed a buddy’s set up that is built around a Safariland competition belt, a stripped down ALS holster, some TACCOM Qualoads, and a single pistol mag and single AR mag carrier (from unknown manufacturer).  Again, it was borrowed.

The Qualoads worked as designed, but I need to look around for something a little more secure as shells would fall out occasionally.  My twin/dual reloads were satisfactory, but need improvement and I am not yet there with quad loads.  I would definitely go with additional pistol and rifle mag pouches as my pockets were at times stuffed with extra magazines depending on the stage.  This may not be a big concern in a sanctioned 3GN match, but with a COF that was all handgun and with one that limited everyone to 6 rounds in each magazine, they started to add up.

I did not go without some sort of malfunction on one or multiple guns on any given stage.  I am chalking the problems up to ammo on the rifle and shotgun and problem TBD on the Glock.

The Winchester Universal Game & Target 7 1/2  shot that I started with gave me numerous malfunctions in the first course of fire (COF) in the JM Pro.  Another helpful shooter advised that his 930 did not like steel heads/rims and he provided me with some brass headed Suprema 8 shot to finish out the day with.  The Suprema worked out great without another malfunction in the shotty.

Suprema

As for the .223 ammo I was using, the Atlanta Arms remanufactured ammo that I was shooting caused way too many malfunctions to mention and really hurt my times.  It is what I had the most of on hand for boxed .223, but I also had two boxes of Gorilla Ammo 69gr Sierra MatchKing OTM in my bag and the rest of the match was flawless with that ammo.

3-GUN_Gorilla

Lastly, the Glock 19 had a lot of problems.  At first I thought that it may have been too dry, but some added lube did not remedy the single shot problem that I was having.  The gun was clean, so fouling was not a problem.  I have yet to break down the gun to armorer level, but I think that it may be an extractor issue.  Once the gun is back together I will run some quality ammo through it to ensure that the Speer ammo I was using was not a bad batch.  I guess it is just a sign to upgrade to a G34.

The courses of fire were fun, yet challenging.  There were initially 5 COF, but one had to be cut out due to Hunter Education being taught on one of the lanes.  Only 2 COF involved all 3 guns, while 1 was all handgun and the other was all rifle.  That was a little disappointing, but nevertheless challenging.

3-GUN_Golf_Cart

Prior to the match, I was advised by a friend to have some sort of jogging stroller to haul my gear/guns around with me.  Unable to find a reasonably priced stroller on short notice, I re-purposed my golf pull cart with some 3″ PVC pipe to haul around the shotty and the AR.  It worked out okay, but still had to haul the ammo bag around.  Not the end of the world, but still a PITA.  Will work on a more substantial solution for the next match.

20150628_Score-Card

 

Overall, it was a great experience for my first semi-competitive shoot, especially since I was not stressed about my times and was there to get my feet week.

Here is to much more practicing, training and improving on times.

 

HK VP40 Handgun Now Available

VP40-Left_Web

 

 

NEWS RELEASE FROM HK:

Heckler & Koch added a .40 caliber model to its new VP striker fired pistol line. The VP40 (Caliber .40 S&W) joins the 9 mm VP9 that was introduced to the U.S. commercial and law enforcement markets in June of 2014.

“Just a year after launching the VP series pistol with the 9 mm VP9, we are thrilled to have a .40 caliber model join the line-up,” said Michael Holley, HK-USA Vice President for Commercial and Law Enforcement Sales. “Last year the VP9 took the market by storm and the VP40 promises to live up to its birthright. For civilian shooters and law enforcement agencies looking for a little more power to go with the VP’s well-recognized superior quality – this is it. Once again it shows Heckler & Koch’s commitment to the U.S. market and American shooters.”

VP40-Right_Web

The VP pistol line has been in development for more than four years and its debut marked the return of HK to striker-fired models. Heckler & Koch pioneered striker fired handgun designs with the HK VP70 and P7 pistols more than 35 years ago and was also the first company to produce polymer frame models. The 9 mm VP9 has been one of Heckler & Koch’s most successful products – selling widely – and receiving positive reviews from civilian and law enforcement shooters throughout the U.S.

Wayne Weber, President of HK-USA stated, “Like the 9 mm VP9, the VP40 has been through just about every test and challenge possible. Heckler & Koch’s strict company testing program put the VP40 through just about every trial imaginable; NATO and U.S. NIJ drop tests, water, dust, mud, and sand tests worst that the most extreme environmental conditions in the world.”

VP9-oblique-with-grip-panels-and-backstraps-JUNE-11-2014

VP40 function and abuse tests included firing thousands of rounds of a wide variety of ammunition types through several test pistols. Unlike some manufacturers, Heckler & Koch test fires every VP40 pistol for accuracy and function.

The VP40 has the same excellent, precise trigger that debuted on the VP9. And the VP40 grip can be customized to fit any shooter by using a mix of three interchangeable backstraps and six grip panels.

The charging supports – a feature introduced on the first VP models is present on the VP40 as well. These small, removable wings on the rear of the slide make cocking and manipulating the pistol much easier than other handgun designs. VP pistols also have a safer and easier disassembly process than many competing models.

Covered by Heckler & Koch’s limited lifetime warranty, the VP40 is designed and manufactured in Oberndorf, Germany with HK’s famous long-term durability. The VP40 is value priced with a suggested retail cost of $719. A law enforcement configuration VP40 with tritium night sights and three magazines is also available for $819 SRP. VP40 pistols are shipping now (June 2015).

About Heckler & Koch

Heckler & Koch is the world’s premier small arms systems company and a major supplier to global military, law enforcement agencies, and civilian shooters. An innovative leader in design and manufacturing, Heckler & Koch provides technologically advanced firearms, logistical support, training, and specialized services with the highest standards of innovation and reliability to its customer base. Heckler & Koch’s well-known range of products include the USP series pistols, MP5 submachine gun, the MP7 Personal Defense Weapon, the G36 weapon system, the HK416 enhanced carbine, HK45, P30, and most recently VP series pistols.

Handgun Shooter Diagnostics

Have you ever been to the range with your handgun and you cannot hit where you are aiming, but still have a solid or semi-solid grouping of where your shots are?  The problem is probably not  your sights.  Check out the diagnostic charts below (one for righties and one for lefties) to see what your problem may be.  The charts are intended to use the center circle for where your point of aim is and the pie-shaped wedges around it to diagnose where your rounds are actually striking.

Happy shooting! RH

LH*Note:  These charts are not a ZERO7ONE creation and if anyone knows who to give proper credit to, please let me know.

 

Blade-Tech Handgun Training Barrel Review

Blade-Tech, a company who is well known for their handgun, Taser, and accessory holsters, also produce many other great products for the gunfighter, trainer, or weekend shooter.  One of those products is their training barrel, which were developed exclusively for the professional LE/MIL and Civilian Firearms Training Industry.

Blade-Tech Training Barrel 006_1000

When I was searching for a training option for building clearing, non-firing movement drills, and introducing new shooters to a firearm, I had considered purchasing a blue/red gun.  Though the blue/red guns have their place in training, they do not offer the realistic feel and function of a real firearm.  In reality a blue/red gun is a chunk of plastic that is molded to simulate what a specific handgun looks like.  Blue/Red guns do not have the functionality of a true firearm and obviously do not have the same feel with weight and texture.  If you are going to train, train realistically.  If your handgun has a safety, shouldn’t you practice disengaging and reengaging the safety throughout your training sessions?

Blade-Tech Training Barrel 003_1000

Aside from wanting a training option for what has previously been mentioned, one of my training rituals is “dry-fire” practice.  It should be in every shooters ritual.  Prior to “dry-fire” drills, the individual performing the drill shall ensure that a magazine is not inserted into the handgun and both visually and physically check that their handgun’s chamber is clear of any ammunition.  Once the handgun is determined to be clear, the individual should ensure that they do not have any sources of ammunition on their person, or around their training area.  Once all of these tasks have been completed, the individual conducting the “dry-fire” practice should ensure that they point their weapon in a safe direction and not to point their handgun at anything that they are not willing to destroy.  I could go on and on about how many checks and balances are needed when ensuring your handgun is clear, having it pointed in a safe direction, etc.  However, time after time I hear about someone performing “dry-fire” practice and even after they think that they have mitigated any possibilities that their weapon will not fire, they still end up shooting something (TV, cat, wall, loved one, etc.) either during or directly after the training session.

Blade-Tech Training Barrel 001_1000

Enter the solution.  As long as you are capable of field stripping your handgun to the point of being able to remove the barrel and correctly putting it back together, you have the capability of switching out your “functional” barrel for a “training” barrel.  The Blade-Tech Training Barrel is made out of a strong yellow impact-resistant material that will resist harsh chemicals and withstand intense training scenarios.  The Training Barrel has a solid core which will not allow ammunition to inadvertently be chambered.  And with its bright yellow appearance, there is no mistaking to you and to others around you that the weapon is completely safe and incapable of firing.  However, while handling your handgun with the Training Barrel in place, you should still treat your handgun as if it were loaded and continue to only point it in a safe direction.  Also, aside from the inability to actually fire ammunition out of the barrel, or performing full malfunction clearance drills (with ammunition), the Training Barrels allow you to have full functionality of your handgun to include racking the slide and performing Primary Malfunction Clearance drills (Tap, Rack and Roll, Assess).

Blade-Tech Training Barrel 008_1000

The benefits of the Training Barrel far outweigh the drawbacks when using this barrel.  Honestly, the only drawback to using the Training Barrel is having to field strip your handgun to replace the barrel.  Depending on what type of handgun you are using, this could be negligible.  Breaking my 1911 down takes me a little bit more time than my Glock, which I can have broken down and reassembled in just under 30 seconds.

Blade-Tech Training Barrel 002_1000

In all I own three Training Barrels, one for my Glock 21, one for my Glock 19, and one for my Colt 1911 platform.  At a cost of around $13.99 each, it is very reasonable to have one for each handgun owned.  If I were to purchase a blue gun for each of the three handguns I have Training Barrels for, it would have cost me around $144.00 instead of around $42.

Available for the following handguns:  1911 (Commander/Full Size/Officer), FN (P9/P40/P45), Glock (17/19/20/21/22/23/31/32),  Kimber Custom TLE, Para Ord (12/13/14/16) , S&W M&P (9/40), Sig (220/220R/226/228/229), and the Springfield (XD40/XDM40).

Click HERE for more information on the Blade-Tech webpage.

SHOT Show 2014 – Sig Sauer P320

P320 Carry
P320 Carry
P320 Full Duty
P320 Full Duty

New for 2014 from Sig Sauer is their new P320, Polymer-Frame Service Pistol.  The P320 will be initially available in 9mm, .40 and .357SIG, with .45ACP expected later in 2014.  The P320 can be converted not only from a full-size duty pistol to a conceal carry pistol, but the slide and barrel can be changed out to provide choices of barrel lengths and caliber.  Though available as an option, the P320 does not come standard with an external safety.  There is a reversible magazine release to accommodate left-handed shooters.  The P320 retails for $713.00.

For more information visit, http://www.sigsauer.com/.

SHOT Show 2014 – Springfield Armory Range Officer

Springfield Armory 9mm Range Officer
Springfield Armory 9mm Range Officer

Springfield Armory has released a new 1911-style 9mm Range Officer handgun for 2014.  The Range Officer features a 5” stainless steel match grade barrel, fully adjustable target sights, a 5-6 lbs trigger, and includes 2 9-round magazines.  The Range Officer weighs in at 41 oz, is 5.5” in height and 8.6” in length.

For more information visit, springfieldarmory.com.

SHOT Show 2014 – Beretta Nano 9mm

Beretta Nano 9mm Handgun
Beretta Nano 9mm Handgun

 

New from Beretta for 2014 is the Nano 9mm conceal carry handgun.  The Nano features a snag-free design, is Beretta’s first striker fire handgun, and has an interchangeable frame for your preference of a variety of colors.  The serial number is sub-chassis to remain in ATF compliance while changing out the frame.  There are 3 passive safeties on the Nano; the trigger safety, the fire pin block, and a deactivator that will “lock” the handgun not allowing the trigger to be pressed without first pulling the slide back approximately ¼ inch.  Two magazines are included, a 6+1 flush magazine and a 8+1 extended magazine.  The Nano retails for $475.   For more information visit, http://www.berettausa.com/, or call 1-800-929-2901.